Room4Talk blog | Happy birthday, Erasmus

Happy birthday, Erasmus

01/04/2017

Europe - 2017

2017 seems to be quite an interesting year for Europe: on 25 March we celebrated the 60th anniversary of the of the Treaties of Rome and on 14 May Erasmus will be 30! So, 2017 is trying to be a small light in the darkness. We won’t aim at discussing any political leanings, not here at least. However, both Eurosceptic people and EU supporters will agree on that: Erasmus has certainly been (one of) the greatest achievement(s) of the European Union. Have you ever wondered how successful this program is? We have some figures here to clear it out.

It was officially created in 1987. Her mother, Sofia Corradi, is an Italian pedagogue who in 1969 came up with the idea of granting to all students the opportunity to study in all the European universities. This was happening when the Berlin Wall was still dividing Europe into two parts.

However, we had to wait until 1986, when the French President François Mitterand supported this project naming it as the famous Erasmus of Rotterdam, a great font of knowledge and proactive traveler.

Nowadays, almost every student dreams about it and despite European funding it can still be hard to make it come true. Though, we are sure the European Commission is doing its best and is working something out.

Since 1987 more than 3.5 million students have taken part to the exchange and this result is still increasing: every year studying abroad is becoming more and more appealing to students, but what for? An experience for the CV? The need to get away from your life? Learning a new language? Quite impossible to answer.

According to the European Commission, Erasmus is a typical experience of students during their bachelor rather than during their master: 70% of the students in the first 3 years of their academic path take part to it against 28% in the master cycle. As far as internships abroad are concerned, 56% of bachelor’s students did one; only 30% during the master.2017 seems to be quite an interesting year for Europe: on 25 March we celebrated the 60th anniversary of the of the Treaties of Rome and on 14 May Erasmus will be 30! So, 2017 is trying to be a small light in the darkness. We won’t aim at discussing any political leanings, not here at least. However, both Eurosceptic people and EU supporters will agree on that: Erasmus has certainly been (one of) the greatest achievement(s) of the European Union. Have you ever wondered how successful this program is? We have some figures here to clear it out.

It was officially created in 1987. Her mother, Sofia Corradi, is an Italian pedagogue who in 1969 came up with the idea of granting to all students the opportunity to study in all the European universities. This was happening when the Berlin Wall was still dividing Europe into two parts.

However, we had to wait until 1986, when the French President François Mitterand supported this project naming it as the famous Erasmus of Rotterdam, a great font of knowledge and proactive traveler.

Nowadays, almost every student dreams about it and despite European funding it can still be hard to make it come true. Though, we are sure the European Commission is doing its best and is working something out.

Since 1987 more than 3.5 million students have taken part to the exchange and this result is still increasing: every year studying abroad is becoming more and more appealing to students, but what for? An experience for the CV? The need to get away from your life? Learning a new language? Quite impossible to answer.

According to the European Commission, Erasmus is a typical experience of students during their bachelor rather than during their master: 70% of the students in the first 3 years of their academic path take part to it against 28% in the master cycle. As far as internships abroad are concerned, 56% of bachelor’s students did one; only 30% during the master.

It seems that the typical Erasmus student is female: around 61% of female students were involved in the Erasmus program or in an internship.

Who are the top sending countries? Well done Spain, Germany, France, Italy and Turkey! On the other hand, the top receiving countries are: Spain, France, Germany, United Kingdom and Italy. (Congratulations, Spain, the 1st sending and receiving country!)

Some academic fields are more willing than others to take up such adventures: the biggest share on the Erasmus “market” goes to the “Social Sciences, Business and Law” area (around 35%) and then to Humanities (around 19%).

Erasmus is probably the most effective synecdoche standing for all the successful and increasing programs within the European Borders and out of them: language programs, research, cooperation, charity work and partnerships, just to mention some of them.

Of course, this is quite a reductive idea of the successful figures of the Erasmus exchange. If you are interested in the topic or you just want to be aware of all the incredible opportunities and to keep posted about new projects, you should visit the European Commission site and read their reports.

We hope these figures and information will encourage you to take up this amazing and enriching challenge: the Erasmus program has never ever disappointed its excited students. We also hope that you will considering a full-immersion during this experience, bringing home the international atmosphere that makes it so stunning. Room4talk will help you live a 360° international experience even when you are tempted to speak your own language. You will fall asleep in your new bed talking to your housemate and speaking a foreign language, and you will get up and see that what you have always wanted is still there: you just need to open that door.


Stefania.T